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14 Most Popular Cured Meats in Italy and Where to Find Them

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Coppa di Parma

Coppa di Parma

Cured meats have become a culinary staple across the Italian peninsula to try during your travels. The Italian term for cured meats is salumi, and is differentiated from French charcuterie by the types of meat used, the flavor of the meat, and the specific Italian methods of preparation and preservation.

When visiting a meat deli in any specific region, you will find the country’s renowned salumi on display. The following list offers information on the 14 best types of salumi from across Italy and where you can find each meat during your Italian vacation.

1. Bresaola - Lombardy

Bresaola

Bresaola

Bresaola is a salted, slightly aged beef dried in a room heated by a wooden fire. The cured meat is lean and reminiscent of pastrami but thinner. It is often served as an antipasto on its own and is similar to carpaccio with thin slices covering the plate, and chefs or cooks typically add shaved Parmigiano-Reggiano for extra flavor. More upscale dishes add shaved white truffles or small, sliced, marinated mushrooms over them. As you travel through the Valtellina area of Lombardy, you will come across Bresaola branded with an Indicazione Geografica Protetta (IGP) label signifying its authenticity to the Lombardy region.

2. Cacciatore - Friuli Venezia Giulia, Piemonte, Emilia-Romagna, and More

Cacciatore

Cacciatore

Cacciatore is a classic, cured meat typically made in Northern Italy with caraway, coriander, dried red chili, black pepper, pork, venison, and wild boar. However, a variation of Cacciatore salami from Southern Italy is made with fennel seed, hot paprika, and ground chili. It is fermented and cured for three weeks and is most often eaten during lunch or dinner as an appetizer. A Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) label safeguards the authenticity of the meat by ensuring it is made in specific regions with pigs raised in Friuli Venezia Giulia, Lombardy, Piemonte, Emilia-Romagna, Umbria, Tuscany, Marche, Lazio, Abruzzo, and Molise.

3. Capicola - Calabria

Capicola

Capicola

Capicola, commonly known as capocollo in Italy, is a classic cured meat made from pork neck or shoulder with paprika, spices, and herbs. It is also dry-cured, very thinly sliced, and commonly served as an appetizer or snack. As you travel to the region of Calabria, you will discover Capicola salami made from Large White and Landrace pigs farmed in the region's ideal climate and cured in the high temperatures and natural humidity. A PDO label safeguards the type and quality of the meat, as well as the locations in which it is cultivated and produced.

4. Coppa - Emilia-Romagna

Coppa

Coppa

Coppa is a cured Italian meat, aged for at least six months but less than a year, made from boneless pork shoulder and hand-rubbed with spices such as cinnamon, cloves, bay seeds, and nutmeg. It can also contain chili pepper, depending on the province in which it is produced. The popular salami possesses the PDO label ensuring its authentic production in the Arda Valley of Emilia-Romagna. The tradition of the Coppa Piacentina DOP has been passed down through the generations, and it is now produced in various provinces within the Emilia-Romagna region, including Pianello Val Tidone, Bettola, and Gragnano Trebbiense.

5. Cotechino - Molise, Trentino, Veneto, and More

Cotechino

Cotechino

Often referred to as the filet mignon of prosciutto, Culatello is an exquisite cured meat made from prized cuts of the rear legs of a pig and mixed with wine and pepper before aging between 10 and 12 months for a delicate but noticeable flavor. Culatello di Zibello has gained PDO status, celebrating the delicacy whose tradition dates back to at least the 15th century. The authentic cut must derive from pigs that were born and raised in the regions of Emilia-Romagna or Lombardy and processed in the communes of Busseto, Zibello, Soragna, and Roccabianca in the Parma province.

6. Culatello - Emilia-Romagna and Lombardy

Culatello

Culatello

Often referred to as the filet mignon of prosciutto, Culatello is an exquisite cured meat made from prized cuts of the rear legs of a pig and mixed with wine and pepper before aging between 10 and 12 months for a delicate but noticeable flavor. Culatello di Zibello has gained PDO status, celebrating the delicacy whose tradition dates back to at least the 15th century. The authentic cut must derive from pigs that were born and raised in the regions of Emilia-Romagna or Lombardy and processed in the communes of Busseto, Zibello, Soragna, and Roccabianca in the Parma province.

7. Guanciale - Umbria and Lazio

Guanciale

Guanciale

Guanciale is a traditional cured meat in Italy and is made from pork jowl or belly fat and is often used as a cooking ingredient to imbue dishes such as pastas, risottos, and stews with depth and richness. It is commonly flavored with black pepper, garlic, and rosemary, permeating the inner layers of the meat during the curing process. It plays a starring role in dishes from Umbria and Lazio, such as the classic pastas of amatriciana and carbonara. At restaurants in these regions, you will find silky Guanciale used to enhance the flavors of main fish dishes and side dishes with sautéed vegetables typically served at lunch or dinner.

8. Lardo - Tuscany

Lardo

Lardo

Lardo is made with black pepper, nutmeg, and other savory spices or herbs mixed with pork fat during the curing process. While not actually meat itself, the creamy texture and luscious flavor have developed a popular following, especially in the northern region of Val d’Aosta, in addition to neighboring areas that are known for long, cold winters. Cured Lardo can be eaten on its own as salumi and is often sliced thin and served on a piece of dark, whole grain bread with a little bit of honey. It has gained IGP status for its history within the Tuscan region dating back to the Barbarians who raised pigs here after the fall of the Roman Empire.

9. Mortadella - Emilia-Romagna, Abruzzo, and Lombardy

Mortadella

Mortadella

The traditional Italian Mortadella is one of the country’s most famous, cured meats made from pork with additional pork fat and flavorful spices. Pistachios and garlic are often added for extra flavor as well, with the intermittent addition of truffles for a rich, layered, and powerful contribution. The recipes can change between regions with the Mortadella from Campotosto in Abruzzo featuring large strips of lard in the mixture while the Mortadella from Fegato in Lombardy uses fatty pork sausage with liver. The original recipe dates back to the Middle Ages in the city of Bologna, which is located in the region of Emilia-Romagna.

10. Porchetta - Lazio

Porchetta

Porchetta

The classic Porchetta is made from split-roasted pork that is flavored with garlic and pepper and then deboned. Traditionally, the boneless pork roast of Porchetta stems from the region of Lazio, where the capital city of Rome is located, and the town of Ariccia has gained the IGP status, making it a must-visit spot during your vacation in Italy. Many other areas of Italy lay claim to the dish, but Porchetta from Central Italy served in a sandwich for lunch or as an antipasto during a larger, multi-course meal is what you should be looking for.

11. Prosciutto - Emilia-Romagna

Prosciutto

Prosciutto

Traditional Prosciutto is one of Italy’s most famous cured meats and is made from ham, supporting the common colloquial title in English of “Parma Ham.” It is dry-cured for at least 210 days, thinly sliced, and served as an antipasto or on sandwiches as a snack or for lunch. The different regions of Italy that produce Prosciutto account for the distinctive flavors of each, stemming from the way farmers raise the pigs, the type of diet the pigs have, and the nutrients in the air while the meat cures. That said, authentic PDO labeled Prosciutto is famously produced in the province of Parma in the Emilia-Romagna region.

12. Salame - Calabria, Tuscany, and More

Salame

Salame

Italian Salame is made from a variety of meats such as pork, boar, beef, and venison and stems from various regions across the peninsula, including the famous salames of Genoa, Calabrese, and Milan. The distinctions between the Salame across Italy derive from the meat that is used and the microclimates of each province in which the animals are raised, and the meat is cured, changing the stuffing and casings that producers use in addition to the seasonings. Restaurants in Calabria serve spicy salame, whereas Salame Genovese is cured in Tuscany, so you will find variations all over Italy during your visit.

13. Soppressata - Molise, Campania, Basilicata, Calabria, and More

Soppressata

Soppressata

You will introduce your senses to the smoky aromas and peppery flavors of classic Soppressata from Italy as you travel to the regions of Molise, Campania, Basilicata, Calabria, and more. Typically, the production of Soppressata uses hand-cut meats that are made with ground, sweet red pepper, and spices that have been stuffed into casings and flattened. Soppressata di Calabria is often served sliced alongside homemade bread, cooked or raw vegetables, and cheeses such as Asiago for a delicious appetizer to accompany polenta, risotto, and typical Calabrian main courses.

14. Speck Alto Adige - South Tyrol

Speck Alto Adige

Speck Alto Adige

Speck from Alto Adige in the South Tyrol region is bacon that is rubbed with salt, pepper, juniper berries, and various herbs growing in the northern alpine landscape. The process of lightly cold smoking the meat over beechwood chips adds the quintessential flavor for which it is known. The particular aging method and slow-drying the meat in the particular microclimates inside cellars account for the noteworthy maturation over six months. Speck Alto Adige does not need to be cooked like typical bacon and instead is commonly served in starters, first courses, and main dishes as an ingredient or sliced finely on its own with melon and fig.

How to Plan your Italian Vacation

Italian Salumi with wine and a coastal view

Italian Salumi with wine and a coastal view

Cured meats are a staple delicacy in Italian cuisine and each iconic meat is derived from specific regions, based on the unique conditions, distinguished provincial processes, and generations-old flavor profiles. Learn more about the complementary flavors with Italy’s Most Popular Cheeses you can enjoy on your trip or browse our Italy Travel Guide for further inspiration on ways you can explore Italy with your preferences in mind. For additional helpful advice, feel free to contact our dedicated travel specialists by completing a Trip Request or calling us on 1-888-265-9707.

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